Spring Cleaning

Now that the days are getting brighter it's a good time to have a bit of a tidy-up. Read our tips.

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Spring is here! We know it’s been a bit of a struggle to keep on top of cleaning when there have been bigger problems! Now that the days are getting brighter it’s a good time to try and find the motivation to have a bit of a tidy-up, or even to go all out for a deep clean if you feel up to it. We’ve compiled a handy list of things you might not have even considered giving a clean in new accommodation, as well as some tips for keeping on top of things (and making cleaning easier!) in the long run. 

Cleaning Systems 

Decide what the most important things to clean are. You don’t have to clean everything all at once and starting with what needs to be cleaned most - whether that’s cleaning out the fridge or cleaning one room - is one method you can use.? 

Alternatively, you can organise what needs doing by ‘high energy’ and ‘low energy’ tasks and work your way through things that way! This is especially great if you tend to get tired and give up halfway through. As an example, if you decided the kitchen was your priority, you could split up high energy tasks - like cleaning out the oven - so nobody needs to do more than one, and then a couple of low energy tasks - like wiping the counters or cleaning the microwave - per person.? 

Keep in mind that if you are sharing communal spaces with other people, you should not be doing all the cleaning alone. You may find you prefer a rota that assigns weekly tasks, or specific rooms to people (or two people to the kitchen, which gets more wear and tear), but finding a method that works to fairly split up chores is important for keeping the peace (and the hygiene levels up) long-term!

Wait, that needs cleaning too? 

When I first moved into my house, there were a lot of things I didn’t even realise NEEDED cleaning at all! But it is important to try and keep on track of things, and even if you live in student accommodation and have a cleaner, they are not responsible for regular deep cleans. 

  • Tap aerators: You can unscrew these from the spout, where the water is coming out of. With honesty, I had no idea these even came off the tap at all and was horrified to see the dirt build-up when they were replaced. You might not have one on every tap, but there is a good chance your kitchen one will at the very least. These should be replaced every year or so to avoid dirt and mineral build-up, and you can get new ones quite cheaply - a small price to pay for cleaner, nicer-tasting water!
  • Showers. Shower heads build up limescale and germs quicker than you realise, and the absolute best way to clean them (and a lot of other things) is white vinegar. If your head is looking a bit grimy, take it off and let it soak for a few hours in vinegar, before giving it a scrub. You can also use a white vinegar and baking soda paste to clean your shower walls if they have started getting grimy, as well as your shower door - if you have a curtain, it might be machine washable! If not, the white vinegar and baking soda combo is back again?
  • The washing machine. If your clothes have started coming out smelling funny, or worse… you might be overdue a good clean. Just running a cycle through with distilled white vinegar and baking soda is great for normal maintenance, but take care to rub a cloth soaked in white vinegar around your door seals and gasket too - these are the places scum, dirt, hair etc. will build up. We found an easy step-by-step guide from dengarden.

And finally, this one isn’t cleaning per se but if you live in a private residence and don’t get regular fire alarm checks, please make sure to remember to check them yourself - batteries don’t last as long as you think. It takes barely any time and will keep you and everyone in your building safe. 

Hannah Anstee | School of  Journalism, Media, and Culture  | Third Year

 

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